Christ Church Cathedral’s Children’s Choir Summer Camp, Hartford

Christ Church Cathedral’s Children’s Choir Summer Camp, Hartford

Christ Church Cathedral’s Choir Summer Camp for kids is the ultimate summer adventure, blending the joy of music with an array of exciting activities! Imagine spending your days singing, playing games, and making new friends in the inspiring setting of the historic cathedral. This camp is perfect for all kids; no prior music experience is needed! Learn the basics of music and singing through captivating storytelling, hands-on activities, arts and crafts, and engaging lessons that make learning fun. But that’s not all—campers will enjoy thrilling outings, like a walk to the skate park, a graffiti tour, and an unforgettable trip to see the Yard Goats with an exclusive behind-the-scenes stadium tour! This camp promises to hone your musical talents and create lasting memories filled with fun, friendship, and adventure. Don’t miss out on the chance to be part of this incredible summer experience!

Cost is $25 per child. Assistance is available if needed. Contact our Director of Music to register and if you have any questions at directorofmusic@cccathedral.org

ECCT Iconography Project with Kelly Latimore

Interviewed & Voiceover by Caela Collins

Listen to the Story


With the support of Bishop Diocesan, The Rt. Rev Jeffrey W. Mello, on Tuesday, June 20, the Racial Healing, Justice & Reconciliation Network and the Office of Mission Advocacy, Racial Justice, and Reconciliation created an Art Exhibition (on display until Convention; all are welcome to come and view) at The Commons, Meriden which diversifies sacred images as an embodiment of our collective spirituality followed by a lecture with artist, Kelly Latimore.

Kelly Latimore is one of the most celebrated artists of contemporary religious icons, that’s dedicated to prayerfully creating art depicting “God in plain sight.” Latimore’s modern take on the centuries-old practice of iconography in recent years fuses bible imagery and modern cultural resets. He substitutes well-known biblical figures for those who represent the marginalized and oppressed. For instance his piece, “Mama,” a pietà icon, which represents the 13th station: ‘Jesus is taken down from the cross’. In this image, Jesus is depicted as the late George Floyd, an image that was carried by Black Lives Matter marchers.

The below artwork was purchased by ECCT in June 2023

Mama

Kelly Latimore 


St. Joseph

Kelly Latimore 

Artist Statement:

As an artist, I’m entering into this improvisation or this dialogue, which I think doesn’t happen in a lot of artists’ work. Working on this artwork with churches can be very hard. But what is so gratifying and is a gift to me is that part of the work: the communality, the conversations about images that mean something to them and that want to push them toward communities and push them toward new ways of being in the world and new ways of relating to one another. I wouldn’t be able to enter into that if I wasn’t doing this work specifically, so I think it’s just about receiving those gifts and doing the best I can to translate that gift [of commonality] into the work.

The Benefits of Silence

“We are just constantly inundated with images. What happens, especially with the social media world, TikTok, Instagram, whatever, is that we can be so quick to speak about something. I hope my art has the potential to teach us not to speak into something but to learn how to observe, to be still, and observe something. And that’s my hope for these images, that they can potentially create dialogue. Not only an internal dialogue but also a dialogue between each other. And that just observing and not speaking into something, I think, is the first part of connecting to the piece of art, whether it’s art in churches, in this iconography, or elsewhere.” -Kelly Latimore

Food for Thought

“What is our church art for? Is it glorified wallpaper, or can it be something that can help us see each other, see in new ways and see God in new ways?”