Unlocking God’s Love Through Forgiveness Daylong Retreat, Trinity Retreat Center

St. Peter’s, Hebron to hold 52nd Annual Plant Sale!

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church will hold its 52nd annual plant sale on Saturday, May 4 from 9 – 3. Patrons will have a choice of many beautiful hanging baskets, potted geraniums, hanging tomatoes, patio pot tomatoes with cages, salad bowl arrangements, perennials, and a limited number of annual and vegetable plants. The plants will be from Paul and Sandy’s in East Hampton and Malerba’s Farm in Norwich. Also available will be potted perennials from our parishioners’ gardens, and gently used plant and garden items.

There will be a display of materials dealing with Pollinator Pathways Bees and Butterflies in the hall and we will have some native plants for sale, as well as perennials preferred by bees and butterflies. Finally, we will have a broad selection of cement garden statues that are a regular and popular offering of the St. Peter’s Plant Sale.

Don’t forget – May 12th is MOTHER’S DAY. Plants make great gifts! St. Peter’s is located at 30 Church St. (Rt. 85) in Hebron. For more information, please visit our website.

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church Polish Dinner

Saturday, April 20, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. or until sold out. The menu will include pierogies, kielbasa, sauerkraut, stuffed cabbage, sweet and sour cabbage, pickled beets, and your choice of desserts. The cost is $17.00.

This is a take-out only dinner, no pre-orders or reservations, but first come, first served. Servers will come to your car, take your order, and payment, and bring your meal(s) back to your back seat or trunk. No need to get out of your car. Credit cards will be accepted.

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church will hold its first monthly community dinner of the year on A portion of each meal sold will go towards supporting the No Freeze Project. For more details, please contact the church at 860-228-3244 or visit our website at www.StPetersHebron.com. St. Peter’s is located at 30 Church St. (Rt. 85) in Hebron.

Understanding Juneteenth Beyond June

Written and Filmed by Caela Collins

Today marks exactly one month following the Juneteenth National Celebration. As of June 17, 2021, The Juneteenth National Independence Day Act was passed by Congress with unanimous consent. This bill was passed over to President Biden whom signed it into law, making Juneteenth (June 19th) a federal U.S. holiday. Although Juneteenth is a fairly new addition to our list of U.S. federal holidays, it has been a core societal reset which flung the gates of God’s beloved community wide open; challenging the world to be the community God called it and needs it to be*. Stemming back to June 19, 1865, freedom from enslavement was embraced by more than 250,000 African Americans by executive decree.

For “Sacred White Folk,” a term used by Dr. Christena Cleveland, social psychologist, public theologian, author, and activist who has collaborated with the ECCT Office of Mission Advocacy, Racial Justice, & Reconciliation, Juneteenth is a celebration that can be widely celebrated alongside your Black and Brown siblings in Christ due to the divine nature of diversity. From lush green forests to dry sandy deserts, or the luminous stars within the night sky to the pitch-black depths of the frigid ocean, we can note God’s intentionality of diversity. The extent of physical variation within God’s creation is a reliable citation for the Creator’s purpose of painting a beloved community on this earthly canvas.

Quote: The Rt. Rev. Jeffrey W. Mello:

“Jesus is the gatekeeper, not us…I hope you will challenge the church to be the community God calls it and needs it to be, I pray this room will not rest until the church lives up to its promise of being a place of love, and support, and community for ALL…I ask you to join one another, join together, in flinging the gates of God’s beloved community wide open, so that all who seek God may find and know God. That, my friends, is your task, that is OUR shared task and we will keep doing it with God’s help until everyone has life and has it abundantly. “

How to Celebrate Juneteenth

  1. Learn more about the holiday.
  2. Teach others, including children, about the holiday.
  3. Read books about Juneteenth.
  4. Watch videos and documentaries about Juneteenth.
  5. Have a Barbecue Family Feast highlighting red colored foods like fruit punch, red meat, watermelon, strawberries, and red velvet cake, symbolizing the bloodshed, sacrifice, ingenuity, and resilience of enslaved ancestors.
  6. Support Black-owned businesses.
  7. Listen to music from Black artists. June is also Black Music Month.
  8. Visit an African American Museum.
  9. Host a Juneteenth information session at your parish and hire a speaker of color.
  10. Create a Juneteenth inspired Liturgy via hosting a Juneteenth Sunday Service and invite locals within your community to attend and learn.
  11. Learn more about your parish’s past by connecting with the Witness Stones Project.
  12. Collaborate with local Black churches to learn about Juneteenth and its tie to Christianity as a time of Jubilee.
  13. Connect with our Office for Mission Advocacy, Racial Justice, & Reconciliation.
  14. Write a card or kind note or prayer for your Black and Brown siblings in Christ, appreciating their contributions and spread the gift of love.
  15. Contact and coordinate with your local towns or DEI (Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion) Leadership to find out what Juneteenth events are happening within CT!

A Great Example

On June 18th, 2023 St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Hebron hosted a Juneteenth Service. In creating this Juneteenth service, the parish did something groundbreaking by having the descendants of formerly enslaved persons by the parish’s 1st rector officiate the service.

Quote: The Rev. Ron Kolanowski:

“While I was away at a family wedding, I was confident that our lay leadership and others in the wider community would join hands to make this a memorable experience for all.  The descendants of formerly enslaved persons by our first rector took an active part in leading much of the service.  The family is half Muslim and half Christian, and both took active part in the service.  We’re especially indebted to Zakiyyah Peters Hasan for bring us a powerful word for that day and helping to shape the service to reflect the values of all.”